A RANDOMISED CONTROL TRIAL TO ASSESS THE IMPACT OF PSYCHOSOCIAL SUPPORT IMPLEMENTED BY SPIRITUALITY
Name: A Randomised Control Trial to Assess the Impact of Psychosocial Support Implemented by Spirituality For Kids (SFK)
Year: 2008
Client: Duke University
Country: Malawi
Background: The Spirituality for KIDS Program (SFK) represents a multilevel psychosocial support program that focuses on spiritual empowerment of vulnerable children through psycho-educational activities addressing problem solving, cause-and-effect reasoning, life skills and decision-making, coping skills for responding to adversity and stress, social competence, personal autonomy and purpose, and promotion of resiliency. Eight Malawian teachers have been hired and trained in delivering the SFK intervention. To date SFK Malawi has graduated more than 1000 children. SFK Malawi’s unique curriculum – which enables children to increase their sense of empowerment, make healthier choices, decrease reactive behaviors, improve school-related attitudes and improve the quality of their family lives.
Objectives: This evaluation involved a randomized trial of SFK Malawi, a 26-session psychosocial curriculum intended to reduce symptomatology and increase problem solving skills, social skills, resilience, and psychosocial functioning among Malawian OVC. Participants consisted of approximately 600 children, ages 8 to 14 years, who were already receiving services at Consol Homes Orphan Care Centers in Malawi and other Lilongwe area centers working with the SFK program. Outcomes were evaluated using an intent-to-treat design in which all youth consented, enrolled, and randomly assigned to either intervention or services-as-usual (SAU) control conditions were followed and assessed at five standard intervals of (1) baseline, (2) follow-up #1 upon completion of SFK level I (11-15 wks), (3) follow-up #2 (upon completion of SFK levels 2 & 3 (27-32 wks), follow-up #3 (~12 wks post-intervention), and (5) follow-up #4 (~32 wks post-intervention).
Activities: Activities included panel surveys of children, data entry and analysis.
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