UN Women recognizes that violence against women increases their vulnerability to HIV infection. Based on that understanding, UN Women will build on its current achievements in for example the JPGBV program in Makoni to explore the interlinkages between violence against women and HIV. Although, the Zimbabwe National HIV and AIDS Strategic Plan (ZNASP) and various other policies such as the Domestic Violence Act, The Criminal Code and availability of victim friendly units exist; there is not enough evidence to show that HIV/AIDS policies and programmes are adequately addressing violence against women. This gap is accentuated by the HIV/AIDS communities continuing faith in and emphasis on the ABC prevention approach which assumes all sex is consensual. The purpose of this research therefore is not only to explore and conduct a comparative analysis of the interlinkages between VAW and HIV within a peri-urban and rural setting but also to examine the policy and programmatic responses that are in place to address gaps. The study sought to ascertain the relevance, effectiveness and efficiency of existing programmes on HIV in addressing VAW and vice versa. This research will enable the country office to support community efforts and inform national development planning processes and efforts through understanding the socio-economic drivers of VAW and how these increase womens risk to HIV. The evidence generated will also feed into the updating of national strategies such as the Zimbabwe national Gender Based Violence Strategy (2012-2015) which will be up for review and update in 2016 and inform the roll-out and implementation of ZNASP111 (2015-2018) as well as the next Global Fund application process. Therefore, in order to build this evidence base and get a clearer and deeper understanding of the interlinkages between violence against women and HIV in two different settings; UN Women wishes to engage the services of an institution to conduct the comparative study in Epworth and Makoni districts in Zimbabwe. The aim of this research was to understand the interlinkages between VAW and HIV/AIDS and examine the experiences of women survivors of violence and women living with and affected by HIV/AIDS in two different locations. In particular, their understanding of what made/makes them vulnerable to HIV, what role their setting/location plays and whether their status increases their vulnerability to violence. In addition, the study also seeks to examine the relevance, effectiveness and efficiency of existing programmes on HIV in addressing VAW and vice versa in the two districts. The scope of work included: 1. Conducting a comparative analysis of the peri-urban and rural district with regards to; a. the underlying factors that put women and girls at risk of GBV and HIV b. the interlinkages between GBV and HIV c. experiences and needs of women living with HIV/AIDS; experiences of women with medico-legal mechanisms of the state in case of abuse d. the structural and community violence against women living with and affected by HIV and the impact thereof with regards to prevention, treatment, care and support services 2. Examine the national and community response to HIV in addressing VAW and vice versa in the two districts. Specifically; a. track budget allocations and spending and assess the extent to which anti-VAW is funded in HIV/AIDS programming b. examine the relevance, effectiveness and efficiency of existing programmes on HIV in addressing VAW and vice versa. The project had two main outputs: A concise report comparatively detailing the interlinkages between VAW and HIV and the response thereof at national and local level in the two districts. Based on the findings, develop a 10 point recommendation document for priority interventions and areas for UN Women to consider, both in terms of UN Womens own work and to recommend to other stakeholders (GoZ, donors and other multi-lateral agencies).